Monday, February 04, 2013

Maternity Hospital Gown Tutorial Review

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Hospital Gown Tutorial from The Crafty Cupboard Review


Being pregnant a second time so close to my first pregnancy, I remember how awful I look in all of my hospital pictures! I hated how large the regular hospital gowns were on me, and when I was nursing, I felt very exposed because the gown would practically fall off of my small frame. Through Pinterest and Etsy, I have seen so many specialty hospital gowns for sale that I started to investigate. I was surprised to see that they range from $40 to $80 in price. I remembered seeing a DIY maternity hospital gown tutorial on one of my favorite sites, the Crafty Cupboard.
I love all of Melanie's tutorials because they are quick and easy and that is the type of project I like. It always scares me when someone from class comes in with a tutorial because there is always a step missing, vague directions, or jargon I have never heard. The Crafty Cupboard is usually pretty good about giving easy-to-follow instructions.

CONS: To help you decide if you should use this pattern, I am listing the negatives first.

  • SIZE: The finished gown is very small around my underarms. I consider myself a smaller person, and, in the tutorial, she says it is for a smaller person: "pattern is for a smallish person although it can fit bigger with very few alterations;" however, it just really tight under there. If I were going to make it again, I would either enlarge the pattern pieces by 25% on a copier or just draw it out 1/2" around all of the edges.
  • FIT: I think the neckline falls really high on my chest. Again, this fit might be because the pattern turned out to be a little small on me.
  • PRICE: It takes 3 yards of fabric to make (probably why they are so expensive on Etsy), so that is at least $35 to spending on fabric alone. I personally still think it is worth it, but it is something to consider. If you are trying to stay on a budget since this piece is a one- time-wear garment, check out sale fabric or a basic.
  • PATTERN: She tells you to draw an A-line shape to create the pattern. Obviously, you do not want to waste fabric, but make sure you draw a wide enough A-line. I drew my A-line, cut it out, and held it up to my growing belly, and it barely fit around to my sides. I cut it down the middle and decided to use it for the two back pieces then made another one with a much wider A-line for the front. The rest of the pattern was easy to cut out.


PROS: There are definitely a lot of great features about this tutorial, and I think they outweigh the cons.

  • STYLE: I love the way it looks over all. I also love that the neck stays on your body while you are nursing. That solves my exposure issue.
  • TIME: The project was fast and easy. The snaps do take a minute to put on but are still very simple. I left the arms and the bottom serged and did not hem them because I hate hemming, but I think it still looks good.
  • PICTURES: As usual, Melanie gives you a picture for almost every step. This extra detail makes the directions very easy to follow and easy to understand.


CHANGES and things to look out for:

  • YOKE: I tried following these directions: "While you are at the ironing board, iron the outer curve under about 1/2”. I think mine ended up more like 5/8”." That did not work out very well. Ironing a curve like that is almost impossible for me and my patience; just look at my picture below. I thought I was good with an iron but my patience is not.  I decided to sew both sides of the yoke with a basting stitch and rip out my stitch after I ironed it; then I was ready to stuff the gathered back pieces in.
    • My attempt to iron curved edges in = disaster
      Easy to rip out basting stitches.

  • SIDE SEAMS: When sewing the side seams, make sure you have the snap tape tucked into the seam correctly before you sew. I made the mistake of just matching up the sides and had to use my seam ripper to get them lined up correctly.
Snap Tape sticking out 

  • SNAPS: After breaking a needle while putting on the snaps around the yoke, I decided to use the Snapsetter to add snaps to the back. I love this look because you get colored snaps and you can put them where ever you want. I spaced them evenly using one of my favorite notions, the expandable sewing gauge
Expandable Sewing Gauge and Snap Setter



I really enjoyed making this and would make it again with a few adjustments. Melanie did a great job explaining each step with pictures. Here are a few extra pictures I took.









4 comments:

  1. That trick about sewing under the yoke is brilliant!! Why have I never thought of that?! Even though I have absolutely no need for a maternity gown, I'm glad I read this anyway...if only to learn that one trick! Thanks!

    ReplyDelete
  2. Which pattern pieces would you enlarge? all of them or only the front & back?

    Your gown is darling!!! I'm making one for my daughter, whose baby is due in October! My first grand child.

    Thanks,
    Eileen

    ReplyDelete
  3. Eileen, We are so sorry for the delayed response. Count down is on for your grand child! We are very excited for you. I would have enlarged all of the front pieces.

    ReplyDelete
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